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Friends,
I’m taking a sabbatical to work on a personal (writing) project. I’ll be back, online in September posting interesting (to me anyway) mobile marketing stuff.. Have a great summer!

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pewinternet:

The mobile phone saga visualized: This chart says it all. For the first time, more than half of all U.S. adults own a smartphone

More new smartphone data: http://pewrsr.ch/11hzgIA

(via emergentfutures)

Source: pewinternet.org
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futuresagency:

In the coming years, there will be a shift toward what is now known as contextual computing. Always-present computers, able to sense the objective and subjective aspects of a given situation, will augment our ability to perceive and act in the moment based on where we are, who we’re with, and our past experiences. These are our sixth, seventh, and eighth senses.


Read more: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1672531/the-future-of-technology-isnt-mobile-its-contextual

(via emergentfutures)

Source: futuresagency
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emergentfutures:

Chart of the day: Whose lunch has Android been eating?

Full Story: CNN

Source: emergentfutures
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emergentfutures:

CHART OF THE DAY: The Unstoppable Rise Of Over-The-Top Mobile Messaging


OTT messaging has grown exponentially since 2011, when Informa and Portio Research both pegged its volume at about 4 billion daily messages. By year-end 2013, daily OTT message traffic is expected to more than double the amount of daily SMS texts. 

 

Full Story: Business Insider

IM trumps text for the first time

Source: emergentfutures
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adteachings:

I often tell students that there’s really no such thing as a completely original idea. Every new idea is actually a combination of pre-existing ideas or a build on something that came before. This new app from Ellen DeGeneres is a perfect example. Commenters who are hating on the idea are saying that it’s just an electronic version of a game that people have been playing for decades. That is true, but the Ellen version adds a twist: The front-facing camera on your iPhone or iPad records a video of the person who’s giving the clues. The resulting funny video can be uploaded to Ellen’s Facebook page, and the best ones will be aired on her show. So, not only are fans providing the show with content, they’re actually paying to do so. Pure genius.

Here’s a write-up from The New York Times:

On her talk show, Ellen DeGeneres plays a game with celebrity guests where she holds a card up to her forehead showing a word or name, like “Justin Bieber.” The guest then gives clues to Ms. DeGeneres to help her guess the word.

It’s a game that many have played in college dorms or bars. Some call it Celebrity; others might call it Charades. Why not turn this into an iPhone game?

That’s the idea the producers of the Ellen show came up with in October. They hired an iPhone app development studio, Impending, to design and code the game, and released it Thursday in Apple’s App Store.

“Big news!” Ms. DeGeneres said on her Twitter account. “I’ve got a brand new game! Its called ‘Heads Up!’ and you’re appsolutely gonna love it.” Within several hours, Heads Up! had soared to the No. 1 spot on Apple’s list of best-selling apps.

In Heads Up!, you can pick a category like blockbuster movies, animals or music. Then you hold the iPhone up to your forehead with the screen showing the word, and your friends shout clues at you. After you guess it correctly, you put the phone face down and hand it to the next player, who gets a new word. The players pass the phone around, guessing as many words as they can until time runs out.

Unknown to most new players, the front-facing camera on the iPhone is recording a video of the whole game session. The players can save the video, share it on Facebook or even “Send to Ellen.” Sending the video to Ellen posts the video on the Ellen show’s Facebook page, and producers will pick out their favorite videos to play on the television show.

“We have 700 videos uploaded already,” said Daniel Leary, digital producer of “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” and a creator of the app. “We’re getting a video a minute, it’s pretty crazy.”

The game costs $1 in the App Store. Mr. Leary declined to comment on how the revenue would be divided between Warner Brothers, the Ellen show and the app developers. But Bob Mohler, a senior vice president of Telepictures Productions, which produced the game, said its purpose was to expand Ms. DeGeneres’ brand in digital media. The show already has accounts on Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest, he said.

“We expand Ellen’s digital footprint pretty broadly,” Mr. Mohler said. “We’re just constantly trying to find the next idea to continue to grow.”

Amazing use of iPad camera.

Source: adteachings
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adteachings:

This is a scary-good idea for Coke from McCann in Hong Kong: a digital game that actually rewards people for watching the TV commercial. Brilliant.

Here’s the write-up from the Harvard Business Review (hat tip to Don Affleck!):

Plenty of advertising is already embedded in electronic games. The new wrinkle is that gaming can be embedded in ads — perhaps the only hope of engaging some people’s interest long enough to get a message across.

Coca-Cola China’s TV ad for the Hong Kong market invited viewers to use their smartphones to “chok” bottle caps flying across their TV screens. A well-timed waggle of the phone would catch a cap on the phone’s screen, earning points (to be redeemed later for sweepstakes entries). This mobile integration was complicated: For instance, people had to download a special app to play, and the timing of the ads had to be announced in advance so that players would be ready. But it all came together and worked. The app was downloaded 380,000 times in its first month, and exposure to the ad (on TV, YouTube, and Weibo combined) exceeded 9 million views.

Electronic games started out as all whizbang technology and no aesthetic appeal. (Pong, anyone?) Today’s gamers demand not only stunning visuals but also narrative and emotional depth. As advancing technology makes such integration more seamless, many marketers will build on this start. Some of them may be surprised at how rapidly creative talent comes back to the fore.

Groundbreaking!

Source: adteachings